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December 14, 2017

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Love What You Do: Maybe You’ll Do What You Love

I don’t take working from home for granted. Actually, with so many businesses cutting staff, I don’t take working for granted at all. I am grateful, but what I appreciate more is that I can make a living doing what I love. I think of this often when I see people who are miserable at work.


I don’t take working from home for granted. Actually, with so many businesses cutting staff, I don’t take working for granted at all. I am grateful, but what I appreciate more is that I can make a living doing what I love. I think of this often when I see people who are miserable at their work.
People often take jobs for one reason: to pay the bills. When you have a family to feed, you do what’s necessary. But it’s sad to see how unhappy some people are at work. I’m thinking about one employee at a local business I patronize. I’ve yet to see him smile or say a kind word to anyone — even when someone is friendly.
Customer service can be trying, especially when the customer is difficult. But in this man’s case, the employee in the station next to him is usually bubbly and loves to chat. I always hope that I’ll get her when it’s my turn to approach the counter.
I can’t say I’ve always managed to do what I love as an employee, but I usually tried to make the best of it. It’s a choice we make. If we choose to stay miserable, odds are good that we’ll stay stuck in a job we hate and our dissatisfaction will continue to show.
Fortunately, I look forward everyday to getting out of bed, pouring myself a cup of coffee and heading to my office only a flight of steps away. The work never seems to end, but neither do the bills. I’m grateful that I pay those bills from a business that is fueled by satisfaction.
I made a choice long ago to love what I do — so that I could do what I love. Maybe that’s the secret.

Comments

  1. Judy

    I am in search of a customer care or sales position that allows me to work at home. My husband has early onset Alzheimer’s and I am starting to think that I should not be leaving him alone. My many years of sales and marketing experience make me an excellent candidate. Thank you in advance for any suggestions.
    Judy miller9157@verizon.net

  2. i totally agree. happiness is a choice. i always heard that quote and poo poo’d it! unfortunately i didnt embrace that philosophy until i was 36. once i did, my life completely changed. everyday is a struggle to remind myself that i can be happy and friendly regardless of some of my circumstances. most days i choose happiness and at the least, i feel good!

  3. I had a client who told me that you are blessed to work at what your life’s passion. For him an enthusiastic love of roses and an overzealous purchase brainstormed him to sell a new facet to a solid business and make both a success. Sadly that courage man died in his 80’s of Alzheimer’s. Yet his love of gardening sustained his longevity with the disease.
    For me, finding my passion was a journey well worth experiencing. I was shown the path with some Good Orderly Direction from the big guy paving the way. I am blessed to work with aging adults filled with wisdom and knowledge the likes of which I have yet to see. To some serving this population is a burden to others a honor. Perspective is a gift!
    Judy your husband’s disease will be a long arduous journey. Please take time to plan well now with your support resources. If I can be of guidance please write and/or check out my website.
    You are about to embark on the toughest “job” you’ve ever faced! Loving him has been your gift, focus the journey you share in “the present”, cherishing the moments you’ll come to treasure will be grace.

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